Failure of the Alliance for Progress

Published: 19th June 2007
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It is very important to know, that the customary land reforms in countries of Latin America were concentrated on resettlement. They did not get involved with the existent social and political structures; in its place, more long-established U.S. methods towards land redeployment involved foothold of virgin islands, public statement of the new grounds and convey of the native people to the up to that time unoccupied areas. As for the case with the Alliance for Progress, the United States directly got involved with the societal structure of Latin America, while the power of property-owners and bribery of the states were absolutely underestimated with help of the Alliance for Progress.



Well-known revolutionary land rearrangement policies in Cuba and Mexico set the tendency for every farmland policy in Latin America. There in no doubt, that a meaningfully stronger impulsion was needed for strategy to be successfully implemented more willingly than a "Peaceful Revolution" accepted by Kennedy Administration.



Because of the stated above causes the results of the Alliance were not radical in the countries of Latin America. The state of affairs that countries of Latin American faced up till 1960s was too complicated to be resolved with help of $22.3 billion of international aid. There was no considerable improvement made after the years of improvement of land rights in Latin America. Among the ten countries that have experienced the land reform, five had previously had a records of land reform as well as the one in Mexico from 1917, Guatemala and Bolivia from 1953, Colombia since 1960s, Venezuela ever since 1954. The practice of these countries displays that land reform of the Alliance for Progress for sure was a complete failure.



Clearly, U.S. foreign policy needed be much more aggressive in counties of Latin America to reach the goals that were earlier established by the Kennedy Administration.


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